Posted by: William | June 6, 2008

Seven Sayings – Chapter Six

For more information on this edition of Reading Classics Together, swing by Challies.com or pick up the book, The Seven Sayings of the Saviour on the Cross by Arthur W. Pink.

This week Pink discussed Jesus’ “Word of Victory”. Namely, John 19:30.

“When Jesus had received the sour wine, he said, “It is finished,” and he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.”

One of the most profound things that Pink said, toward the end of this chapter, was the crushing defeat that Satan suffered, indicated by these words, “it is finished”. While once Satan had a legal claim on us, as sinners with unpaid debt, he no longer does. Believers have been purchased outright and there is nothing more to be done to make satisfaction. It is finished. In fact, if indeed we did want to add something to Jesus’ work, not only would it be foolish and arrogant, it would also muddy up and defile so already perfect a work.

To that effect, Pink shares an excellent illustration:

Some years ago a Christian farmer was deeply concerned over an unsaved carpenter. The farmer sought to set before his neighbour the gospel of God’s grace, and to explain how that the finished work of Christ was sufficient for his soul to rest upon. But the carpenter persisted in the belief that he must do something himself. One day the farmer asked the carpenter to make for him a gate, and when the gate was ready he carried it away to his wagon. He arranged for the carpenter to call on him the next morning and see the gate as it hung in the field. At the appointed hour the carpenter arrived and was surprised to find the farmer standing by with a sharp axe in his hand. “What are you going to do?” he asked. “I am going to add a few cuts and strokes to your work,” was the response. “But there is no need for it,” replied the carpenter, “the gate is all right as it is. I did all that was necessary to it.” The farmer took no notice, but lifting his axe he slashed and hacked at the gate until it was completely spoiled. “Look what you have done!” cried the carpenter. “You have ruined my work! “Yes,” said the farmer, “and that is exactly what you are trying to do. You are seeking to nullify the finished work of Christ by your own miserable additions to it!” God used this forceful object lesson to show the carpenter his mistake, and he was led to cast himself by faith upon what Christ had done for sinners. Reader, will you do the same?

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